Gall Bladder Surgery Complications

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 11-01-2013

The gallbladder can become diseased at any stage, and any person can be at risk. Inflammation, stones, rupture, sphincter of oddi dysfunction and sphincter constrictions are some of the of the problems that the gallbladder can pick up.

There are medical therapies available for gall bladder illness and sometimes a good diet works as well. However, when the illness is more severe, gall bladder surgery is often needed. Read the rest of this entry »

Bladder Repair Surgery for women

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 06-01-2013

bladder-repair-surgery

Bladder repair surgery is performed when the bladder sags or falls due to a cystocele. A cystocele is a condition caused by weakening of the supporting tissues between the bladder and the vagina wall. This causes the bladder to swell into the vagina. The procedure involves repositioning the bladder to its normal position and strengthening the vaginal wall to prevent recurrent cystocele.

Women who have given vaginal birth may be prone to this condition, as well as women who are going through menopause and whose hormones changes and weaken the pelvic floor muscles. Straining can also occur due to heavy lifting, constipation and obesity. Read the rest of this entry »

Urinary Incontinence Treatment Warning

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 30-08-2012

incontinenceIf you and your doctor are considering surgery to treat urinary incontinence, or you have already undergone such a procedure, there are some things you should know about the most common surgical device used in these procedures — a transvaginal mesh implant commonly referred to as a bladder sling.

Approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the 1990s, the bladder sling has come under fire in recent years as its safety and effectiveness have been called into question. Due to these concerns, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) urges women and their physicians to consider traditional procedures that do not use these products and cautions that women who have had mesh implants should be monitored for complications by their health care professionals. Read the rest of this entry »

Johnson & Johnson cease surgical mesh sales

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 11-06-2012

Well if all the lawsuits about surgical mesh for incontinence weren’t enough to scare you off, how about the most family friendly giant company ceasing to make them?

There’s really only two reasons a big company like Johnson & Johnson would stop selling the surgical mesh:

1. Not enough profit

2. Legal problem

That’s it. So either they weren’t making money which seems like something that could be altered and controlled or the mesh “implants” were becoming  a legal problem. Read the rest of this entry »

Urinary Incontinence Surgery Choices

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 05-08-2011

Surgical procedures for incontinence problems should not be entered into lightly. It is an invasive procedure that doesn’t always fix the problem. Be sure you are diagnosed correctly and all expectations are discussed before you elect to go the surgery route. Read the rest of this entry »

Robotic Prostate Surgery

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 05-08-2011

Robotic prostate surgery is a recently developed procedure to deal with male prostate problems, including the removal of a cancerous prostate. The robotic procedures are less invasive than traditional procedures. They are done in their entirety through a keyhole-sized incision. Roughly 22% of men needing prostate removal choose the robotic procedure over traditional surgery. Read the rest of this entry »

Post Prostatectomy Incontinence

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 05-08-2011

A number of prominent doctors recommend patients use Kegel exercises for their pre and post prostatectomy incontinence. Effective use of Kegels can shorten the return back to normal bladder sphincter functioning.

For males, urinary incontinence often results from prostate treatment. Due to the prostate’s proximity to the bladder, treatment by surgery or radiation will often disrupt normal functioning of the bladder. Incontinence from surgery can last many months and can cause sexual dysfunction. Read the rest of this entry »

Male Incontinence Clamp

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 05-08-2011

One way to deal with male incontinence is through the use of a device called a male incontinence clamp (MIC). These are sold on the internet for relatively low prices and are not marketed as medical devices. Nevertheless, they work by clamping the urethra shut. There is an upper bar (placed on the top side of the penis) attached to a lower bar (placed on the underside of the penis), which, when snapped together, effectively clamp the urethra closed and prevent urine from leaking while the man is wearing the device. Read the rest of this entry »

Incontinence After Prostate Surgery

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 05-08-2011

For males, urinary incontinence after prostate surgery is quite common. Due to the prostate’s proximity to the bladder, treatment by surgery or radiation will often disrupt normal functioning of the bladder. Incontinence can last many months and can cause sexual dysfunction.Incontinence usually occurs because of problems with muscles that help to hold or release urine. The body stores urine— water and wastes removed by the kidneys—in the urinary bladder, a balloon-like organ.

The bladder connects to the urethra, the tube through which urine leaves the body. The internal sphincter allows urine to pass from the bladder to the urethra. If the sphincter becomes damaged, incontinence after prostatectomy is likely.

A swollen prostate can also cause excess retention of urine. The prostate gland stops growing before you become an adult, but after about the age of 50, it will begin growing again.

Sometimes this growth doesn’t cause any problems at all. However, in some men, the prostate enlarges to the point that it acts as a “clamp” against the urethra, resulting in symptoms such as difficulty starting urination, frequent urination or incontinence. If the problems become severe enough, surgery may be required to correct them.Treatment is different with males vs. females due to prostrate gland. Have you discussed your symptoms with an urologist? A prostrate exam is a smart start to determine how your symptoms should be treated.

Bladder Suspension Surgery – Overview

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Posted by admin | Posted in Incontinence Surgery? | Posted on 04-08-2011

In most cases bladder suspension surgery, the implantation of a urethral / bladder sling, can be implanted within 30 minutes. Placement of a sling is a minimally invasive surgery, requiring only a small vaginal incision, and tiny incisions in the abdomen or inner thigh.

Because the procedure is minimally invasive, your physician will choose the anesthesia best suited to your condition and general health: either local, regional or general anesthesia. The sling is inserted under the urethra to provide the necessary support to prevent unintentional leakage of urine, and is then self-anchored securely in place under the skin.

After
The Sling Procedure

After the sling procedure, you may be able to return home in just a few hours. All incisions will be small and should heal quickly. Your physician will most likely advise you that for approximately 4-6 weeks, you should avoid sexual intercourse, heavy lifting and strenuous exercise.

Your physician will provide you with specific information on how to care for yourself after the procedure. As with all surgery, a sling procedure carries some potential risk. Although infrequent, side effects can include bladder injury, post –op discomfort, difficulty urinating and infection. Be sure to speak with your physician to ensure that you fully understand all possible risks involved.

What results can be expected? Urethral slings have had an impressive performance record over the years. They have been used successfully in hundreds of patients in the U.S. and around the world, and studies have shown that on average, 85% of patients are dry after treatment. Each patient is unique, however, and your physician can give you a more specific view of what your expectations should be.